Recordings Reveal Mother Dolphins Use ‘Baby Talk’ To Call Their Young

Recordings Reveal Mother Dolphins Use 'Baby Talk' To Call Their Young

A new study has revealed that mother dolphins use baby talk to call their young.

Dolphin mothers talk like babies, a study reveals.

Dolphin mothers talk like babies, a study reveals.

Dolphin moms talk like babies

Dolphin mothers talk like babies, a study reveals.

Subscribe to NotificationsAnimals communicate through a wide variety of means, although not all sounds that come from animals are communicative in nature. Many species communicate through a variety of signals, from facial expressions and pheromones to body language and facial expressions.Terrifying moment Three orcas attack the crew of a race boat that tries to scare them away - LOOK

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Yes, like us humans. There is a type of sea creature that is known to socialize, play, and even display a unique personality trait that only humans usually have. A new study has revealed that mother dolphins use baby talk to call their young. We can immediately understand when someone is communicating with a baby. His style, tone and voice changes to capture the attention of the young child. It turns out that even mother dolphins do the same kind of baby talk using some sort of high-pitched sound. A study published Monday revealed that female bottlenose dolphins change their tone when addressing their young. The researchers reportedly recorded the characteristic whistles of 19 mother dolphins when they were accompanied by their calves and when they were swimming alone. The research adds that the dolphin’s characteristic whistle is a unique and important signal. “They use these whistles to follow each other. Periodically they say, ‘I’m here, I’m here,'” said study co-author Laela Sayigh, a marine biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She stated that the tone of the The mother’s whistle is higher and her range of pitch is greater than usual when calling her young.”That was true for every one of the mothers in the study, all 19,” said biologist Peter Tyack, a study co -Author from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland The scientists obtained the data by working for more than three decades. They attached special microphones several times to the same mothers of wild dolphins in Sarasota Bay in Florida to record their characteristic whistles, according to an AP report.The entire task was challenging and time-consuming because the research included years in which the dolphins did not have calves.The study focused primarily on signature calls.

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Source: englishtalent.edu.vn

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